Crimewatch


Police Contact Numbers

Emergency Only:     Dial 999


Not an Emergency:  Dial 101

Or report online www.thamesvalley.police.uk


For general enquiries or concerns related to Chicheley and immediate area contact:

Police Community Support Officer (PCSO) Arlene Ormston

arlene.ormston@thamesvalley.pnn.police.uk

07815 590756



Speeding Report

Extracted results for traffic speed monitoring on the A422 through Chicheley are shown below.  There continues to be a small reduction in trafic speed through the village, but still an unnacceptable number of vehicles exceeding the speed limit by a large margin.  These dangerous and inconsiderate drivers will be caught and lose their licences.


Home Security Advice


New Telephone SCAM

An Olney resident posted on Facebook yesterday that he had received a phone call which said "payment is being made to Mr Carlos in South Africa, press 1 to cancel the payment or hang up if I want it to go through".  

Just ignore it and hang up.

Some people may panic and press 1 which is the scammer’s objective.   This diverts the call to a high cost premium line.  Please can you help spread the word especially if you know any vulnerable residents who may get caught by this scam.

Links to Police online forms

There is a dedicated webpage which includes quick links to some of the online forms on the Thames Valley Police website.  It also provides information on some of the most frequent calls received about non-police matters.   Checking this web link will make it easier to address concerns, and save the police time.  We all know there resources are stretched at present. 

https://www.thamesvalley.police.uk/police-forces/thames-valley-police/areas/c/2019/think-before-you-dial/

 

Preventing Heating Oil Theft

Earlier this year there were several incidences of heating oil being stolen from storage tanks in rural Milton Keynes.  A perpetrator was arrested and his vehicle was found fully equipped to remove and store oil from domestic tanks.

Our local PCSO Arlene Ormston has advised that secure, locking caps are available amd has provided a web link for the SpinSecure costing from £55 from Fuel Tank Shop.  https://www.fueltankshop.co.uk/spinsecure-oil-tank-fill-point-lock/p4969.   Other types are no doubt available.




Caravan Stolen from Clifton Reynes

A caravan (Hobby 650 UFF Premium) was stolen from a property in Clifton Reynes some time between 18/07/19 and 20/07/19. 

Thames Valley Police is appealing for witnesses following the theft of this caravan.

If you have any information about this incident, please report it on the Thames Valley Police website or call 101, quoting reference number 43190222846 or URN 670 of 21/07/19.

Message Sent By:  Arlene Ormston (Police, PCSO, Milton Keynes)

"Attempted Theft” from Vehicles

There were reports on social media that people were seen trying car and van doors in nearby villages on 16th July.  

It was also reported on social media that the football club, tennis club and several cars on Lakes Lane, Newport Pagnell were broken into during the previous weekend.

Please be vigilant, ensure your car (and house) is secure, and report anything suspicious to the police.

Theft of Domestic Heating Oil - North Crawley

There have been 2 reports of theft of heating oil from residential houses in North Crawley. This occurred between midnight and 1 am on 13/07/19.

Please be extra vigilant and report any suspicious vehicles or people on the 101 number or 999 if it is a crime in progress.

Many thanks 

Arlene

Message Sent By Arlene Ormston (Police, PCSO, Milton Keynes)

Crime Warnings from Thames Valley Police

It is a sad reflection of the current state of British society that so many of the notices currently being added to this website are about crime.  We are fortunate to have a committed PCSO, and vigilant residents who “keep an eye out” for their neighbours.  Nevertheless, warnings from the Police and Neighbourhood Watch should be noted and actioned:

Church Roof Lead.

The lead roof of Hanslope church was stolen during the weekend of 29th/30th June.  Please report any suspicious activity around local churches.

Abandoned Cars.

The registration number of suspected abandoned cars should be reported to the police using the 101 number.

Fraudulent calls pretending to be from HMRC

What you need to know

Action Fraud has experienced an increase in the reporting of malicious calls and voicemails, to members of the public purporting to be from Her Majesty’s Revenue & Customs (HMRC).

Fraudsters are spoofing genuine HMRC telephone numbers to deceive their victims over the phone. The fraudsters state that as a result of the victim’s non-payment of tax or other duty, the victim is liable for prosecution or other legal proceedings in order to settle the balance. The fraudsters suggest victims can avoid this, by arranging payment to be made immediately by methods such as bank transfer or by purchasing iTunes gift cards.

If the victim is hesitant or refuses to comply, the suspect makes a threat such as immediate arrest, sending bailiffs to the victim’s address or, in some cases, deportation.

Often, the period for which the tax is allegedly due is distant enough to guarantee the victim will have little, if any, paperwork or ability to verify the claims. Once the money is paid the suspects sever all contact with the victim.

In genuine cases, HMRC will initially make direct contact with you via post/letter and potentially follow up that letter with a phone call at a later date.

If HMRC contact you via telephone they will quote the reference number on the initial letter you should have received. HMRC will not discuss something you are not already aware of, like a tax investigation, and will NOT demand immediate payment.

It is vital that the public exercise caution when receiving messages or telephone calls of this nature.

What you need to do

Always question unsolicited requests for your personal or financial information. Just because someone knows your basic details (such as your name and contact details), it doesn’t mean they are genuine. Instead, contact the company directly using trusted methods such as a known email address or phone number.

Legitimate organisations wouldn’t ask you to pay taxes, bills or fees using an iTunes gift card, or any other type of voucher. If you’re contacted by anyone that asks you to do this, you’re likely the target of a scam

Don’t be rushed or pressured into making a decision. Under no circumstances would a genuine bank or some other trusted organisation force you to make a financial transaction on the spot.

Report Phishing attempts. If you receive a call, text or email of this nature and have not lost money, you can report this as phishing to Action Fraud

Message Sent By

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Avoiding Scams

Scams can come in the form of telephone calls, emails or written letters. Often they advise persons that they have won a large sum of money or need to send money to help a person in need. People can be tricked into purchasing fake goods or services. Some of these scammers can be very believable especially to more vulnerable members of society.

Ten golden rules to prevent fraud

Remember these ten golden rules to help you prevent fraud and beat the scammers.

Be suspicious of all ‘too good to be true’ offers and deals. There are no guaranteed get-rich-quick schemes.

Don’t agree to offers or deals immediately. Insist on time to get independent or legal advice before making a decision.

Don’t hand over money or sign anything until you’ve checked someone’s credentials and their company’s.

Never send money to anyone you don’t know or trust, whether in the UK or abroad, or use methods of payment you’re not comfortable with.

Never give banking or personal details to anyone you don’t know or trust. This information is valuable so make sure you protect it.

Always log on to a website directly rather than clicking on links in an email.

Don’t just rely on glowing testimonials. Find solid, independent evidence of a company’s success.

Always get independent or legal advice if an offer involves money, time or commitment.

If you spot a scam or have been scammed, report it and get help. Contact Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or at Action Fraud. Call us on 101 if you know the suspect or they’re still in the area.

Don’t be embarrassed about reporting a scam. Because the scammers are cunning and clever there’s no shame in being deceived. By reporting it, you'll make it more difficult for them to deceive others.

Further Advice:

The Thames Valley Police website has a huge selection of advice on many different types of scam. Please click on the link to take a look: Personal Fraud Advice

Get help or report a scam:

If you think you’ve uncovered a scam, been targeted by a scam or fallen victim to fraudsters, call 101. Reporting crime, including fraud, is important. If you don’t tell the authorities, how do they know it’s happened and how can they do anything about it?

Remember that if you’re a victim of a scam or an attempted scam, however minor, there may be hundreds or thousands of others in a similar position. Your information may form part of one big jigsaw and be vital to completing the picture.

Message Sent By.  Michelle Michel (Police, PCSO, Milton Keynes)

Courier Fraud, Bogus Police and Bank Officials Alert

What you need to know

Individuals have been receiving phone calls from people claiming to be a police officer or banking official

The suspect will say either:

There has been fraudulent activity at the victims’ bank and the staff at the bank are involved, the victim is then asked to withdraw money to either keep it safe or assist the police with their investigation

A business such as a jewellers or currency exchange is fraudulent and they require the victims’ assistance to help secure evidence by purchasing jewellery or exchange a large amount of currency to hand over to the police

The victims’ card has been compromised and used to purchase goods by a suspect, the victim is requested to withdraw their money to keep it safe or hand over their bank card to the police

Occasionally the victim will be told to dial a non-emergency extension of ‘161’ to receive confirmation of the individual’s bogus identity, the bogus official will advise the victim to lie about the reason for the withdrawal or purchase if challenged by staff, as the staff member is involved in the fraud.

A courier attends the victim’s home address to collect the goods the same day.  Often the victim is given a code word for the courier as a way of authentication

What you need to do

Your bank or the police will never:

Phone and ask you for your PIN or full banking password

Ask you to withdraw money to hand over to them for safe-keeping

Ask you to transfer money out of your account

Send someone to your home to collect cash, PINs, cards to cheque books

Message Sent By. Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)